Happy New Year everyone!!!’

And what better way to bring in the new year with a little refresher course on trail cams.

First there has been a trail cam photo circulating on the web since the first or so of the month allegedly originating from South Carolina.

 

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Let me very clear,

“No picture is worth any value unless there is a story behind it.”

Clearly this appears to be a hog. And yes hogs can be brindle patterned.

Problem #1. Here there is absolutely nothing. No story, no location, no date, no time, no source.

Problem #2. First of all this is a trail cam photo which is obviously cropped because there is none of that neat data you get with trail cam photos. We are missing part of the frame to the left, the right and the bottom which usually is where you find such information.

Problem #3. If the “face” on the hind quarters of the hog, was actually a face, where is the IR Eyeshine??? It’s not there!

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We all know the propensity for Sasquatch reports to allege eyeshine, which I have seen myself in one encounter due to the distinct possibility of the creatures having a Tapetum Lucidum. So if that is a face? Where is the eyeshine?

Tapetum Lucidum

The diagram and eyeshine photos credited to https://blog.snapshotwisconsin.org/2017/10/31/the-science-behind-eyeshine/

The only proponents of this picture being a Sasquatch is that, there appears to be a face. Yet there are 3 facts (listed above) that contradict that mere observation.

I only fear the next counterclaim will be the Sasquatch was blinking or had its eyes closed!

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Sasquatch sees the I-R in trail cameras

Now this title is a little deceiving. Because I do not believe that for one second. First of all can anyone tell me what primate can see in the infrared spectrum? How about a mammal that can?  They cannot.

Also a trail camera does not emit a constant infrared beam or flash. The late William Dranginis believed the possibility that the Sasquatch’s hearing could hear the emission of an ultrasonic sound the sensors in the camera may emit. Which is plausible because hearing varies with species of mammals.

But a trail camera uses a passive infrared sensor to detect motion. Here’s the techno-babble courtesy of Wikipedia:

“A passive infrared sensor (PIR sensor) is an electronic sensor that measures infrared (IR) light radiating from objects in its field of view.

The term passive in this instance refers to the fact that PIR devices do not generate or radiate energy for detection purposes. They work entirely by detecting infrared radiation (radiant heat) emitted by or reflected from objects.”

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_infrared_sensor

Trail Cam

Therefore how can a Sasquatch avoid the trail cameras by sensing infrared, when they do not emit an infrared light until such time as the camera is triggered?

They certainly wouldn’t smell them, since most reports of a Sasquatch state their noses are flat indicating they would have scent sensory nerves much like us. Unlike the other critters with snouts, such as bears, hogs, deer and dogs which can smell stuff from very far.

The truth is putting trails cams in the forest is still like needles and haystacks. If you have six trail cams, that’s only 6 needles. Still a bit of luck is needed to get anything viable.


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Till Next Time,

Squatch-D